Pasteurized Donor Human Milk Part 1: Bravo for Brazil

July 16, 2021

Milk banking is on the rise around the world. Google the words ‘milk bank’ and the country you are interested in for a wealth of information. Typing ‘milk bank France’, I learned that the European Milk Banking Association (EMBA) has 249 active banks. The information in this class comes from my knowledge working in a maternity facility in the United States where milk banks operate under the guidelines of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA).

HMBANA was founded in 1985 with the goal of standardizing donor milk banking operations. (Reference 1) Currently there are 31 HMBANA milk banks – 28 in the United States and 3 in Canada. Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, located in Massachusetts, USA is a non-profit community HMBANA milk bank which provides donated, pasteurized human milk to babies throughout the Northeastern United States. This is the milk bank used by the Boston-located hospital where I work. In this post I am sharing information from the HMBANA guidelines. Also note that in this post ‘donor milk’ = ‘pasteurized donor human milk’. Informal milk sharing is also on the rise but is a topic that will not be addressed here.

How is donor milk collected and processed? The process starts with a woman who volunteers to pump and donate her milk. Milk donors are healthy, lactating women with a surplus of milk and babies of any age. Bereaved and surrogate mothers may also donate. A mother is eligible to donate her milk if:

  1. She and her infant are in good health and have approval by her obstetrician and the baby’s pediatrician.

  2. She does not smoke or regularly use any medications, herbs or megavitamins.

  3. She does not consume more than two ounces of hard liquor or the equivalent in a 24-hour period.

Donors to HMBANA milk banks are volunteers, they are not paid. HMBANA member banks are nonprofit organizations.

The donating mother participates in a triple screening process:

  1. Questionnaire and verbal phone interview

  2. Physician letter confirming the health of the donor mother and her infant

  3. Mother’s blood is screened (paid for by the milk bank) and found to be negative for: HIV 0, 1, 2 - HTLV 1, 2 - Hepatitis B and C - and Syphilis

If the mother is approved, she pumps and then freezes her milk as soon as possible. She sends her frozen milk via Federal Express shipping to the milk bank or drops her milk off at a milk depot. A woman can donate for as long as she wishes. The donating mother’s blood labs are repeated every 6 months. At the milk bank, milk from donors with preterm infants are processed and stored separately from women with full term infants.

Once the milk arrives at the milk bank:

The milk is thawed, pooled (2-4 donors), and poured into bottles.

Trays of bottles containing milk are heated in a shaking water bath using the Holder method of pasteurization: heated to 62.5 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes and then quick cooled to 4 degrees Celsius. Holder pasteurization is the standard treatment for human milk donated to milk banks across the world.

One bottle of the batch is opened and tested for bacteria. If any bacteria are found, the entire batch is thrown out. Pasteurization eliminates bacteria while retaining the majority of the milk’s beneficial components. HIV and cytomegalovirus are among the pathogens destroyed during pasteurization.

If no bacteria are found, the bottles are dried and labeled with batch number, date, and name of the milk bank.

The milk is then refrozen at -20 degrees Celsius and ready to be shipped out.

What does Holder pasteurization do to human milk?

A summary of the 2016 paper by Peila, published in Nutrients, is provided below. (Reference 2)

More information on how fresh mother’s milk, donor milk and infant formula compare is summarized in the chart below. (Reference 3)

Donor milk from HMBANA member, Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast, costs $4.50 per ounce which pays for staffing, processing and shipping costs. Per the HMBANA 2019 Best Practices statement, thawed pasteurized donor milk can be stored in a refrigerator for 48 hours.

Did you know?

  • In over 40 years of modern milk banking, there has never been a documented case of an infant being harmed by donor milk.

  • Brazil is a global leader in milk banking with 216 milk banks and 127 milk collection points. (Reference 4) The country has at least one milk bank in each of the its 26 states. Firefighters serve as runners of mother’s milk to depots. (A milk depot is a conveniently located collection site that accepts milk from approved human milk donors.) In some states, firefighters collect milk from donors daily because few Brazilian homes have large enough refrigerators or freezers to hold the milk. The milk banks do traditional milk bank activities and more. They run training programs for community peer counselors and serve as sites for access to pediatricians, social workers and other types of support persons. Mothers are referred to milk banks for support upon discharge from the maternity hospital.

  • Many neonatal intensive care units are using donor milk as medical organizations like the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommend donor milk for premature infants to protect against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

  • If there is a need to supplement a breastfeeding infant, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) recommends choosing the supplement in the following order: #1 expressed mother’s milk, #2 donor human milk, and #3 infant formula. (Reference 5)

References

1.  Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) website. www.hmbana.org

2.  Peila C, Moro GE, Bertino E, et al. The effects of Holder pasteurization on nutrients and biologically-active components in donor human milk: A review. Nutrients. 2016 Aug;8(8):477. doi.10.3390/nu8080477

3.  Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice, 3rd edition. Edited by Rebecca Mannel, Patricia J. Martens, and Marsha Walker. 2013. Chapter 36: Donor Human Milk Banking. Pages 701-714. James & Bartlett Learning

4. Gutierrez D, et al. Human milk banks in Brazil. J Human Lac. 1998;14(4): 333-335.

5. Kellams A, et al. ABM Clinical Protocol #3: Supplementary Feedings in the Healthy Term Breastfed Neonate, Revised 2017. Breastfeed Med. 2017;12(3). www.bfmed.org/protocols

Share The Lactation College

Leche materna donada pasteurizada: Bravo por Brasil

Los bancos de leche están en auge en todo el mundo. Busca en Google las palabras "banco de leche" y el país que te interesa para obtener una gran cantidad de información. Al teclear "banco de leche Francia", me enteré de que la Asociación Europea de Bancos de Leche (EMBA) cuenta con 249 bancos activos. La información contenida en esta clase procede de mis conocimientos al trabajar en un centro de maternidad de Estados Unidos, donde los bancos de leche operan bajo las directrices de la Asociación de Bancos de Leche Humana de Norteamérica (HMBANA por sus siglas en inglés).

La HMBANA se fundó en 1985 con el objetivo de estandarizar las operaciones de los bancos de leche donada. (Referencia 1) Actualmente hay 31 bancos de leche de HMBANA: 28 en Estados Unidos y 3 en Canadá. El Mothers' Milk Bank Northeast, situado en Massachusetts, EE.UU., es un banco de leche comunitario de HMBANA sin fines de lucro que proporciona leche humana donada y pasteurizada a los bebés de todo el noreste de Estados Unidos. Este es el banco de leche que utiliza el hospital de Boston donde trabajo. En este post comparto información de las directrices de HMBANA. También hay que tener en cuenta que en este post "leche donada" = "leche humana donada pasteurizada". Compartir la leche de manera informal también es algo que va en aumento, pero es un tema que no se tratará aquí.

¿Cómo se recoge y procesa la leche donada? El proceso comienza con una mujer que se ofrece a extraer y donar su leche. Las donantes de leche son mujeres sanas y lactantes con un excedente de leche y bebés de cualquier edad. También pueden donar las madres que perdieron a su bebé y los vientres de alquiler. Una madre puede donar su leche si:

  1. Ella y su bebé gozan de buena salud y cuentan con la aprobación de su obstetra y del pediatra del bebé.

  2. La madre no fuma ni toma regularmente medicamentos, hierbas o megavitaminas.

  3. No consume más de dos onzas de licor fuerte o su equivalente en un periodo de 24 horas.

Las donantes de los bancos de leche de HMBANA son voluntarias, no se les paga. Los bancos miembros de HMBANA son organizaciones sin fines de lucro.

La madre donante participa en un triple proceso de selección:

  1. Cuestionario y entrevista telefónica verbal

  2. Carta del médico confirmando la salud de la madre donante y de su bebé

  3. Se analiza la sangre de la madre (pagado por el banco de leche) y se comprueba que es negativa para: VIH 0, 1, 2 - HTLV 1, 2 - Hepatitis B y C - y Sífilis

Si la madre es aprobada, se extrae la leche y la congela lo antes posible. Envía su leche congelada al banco de leche a través de Federal Express o la deja en un depósito de leche. La mujer puede donar durante todo el tiempo que desee. Los análisis de sangre de la madre donante se repiten cada 6 meses. En el banco de leche, la leche de las donantes con hijos prematuros se procesa y almacena por separado de la de las mujeres con hijos a término.

Una vez que la leche llega al banco de leche:

La leche se descongela, se agrupa (de 2 a 4 donantes) y se vierte en botellas.

Las bandejas de botellas que contienen leche se calientan en un baño de agua con agitación utilizando el método Holder de pasteurización: se calienta a 62.5 degrees Celsius durante 30 minutos y luego se enfría rápidamente a 4 degrees Celsius. La pasteurización Holder es el tratamiento estándar para la leche humana donada a los bancos de leche de todo el mundo.

Se abre una botella del lote y se comprueba si hay bacterias. Si se encuentra alguna bacteria, se desecha todo el lote. La pasteurización elimina las bacterias y conserva la mayoría de los componentes beneficiosos de la leche. El VIH y el citomegalovirus son algunos de los patógenos que se destruyen durante la pasteurización.

Si no se encuentran bacterias, las botellas se secan y se etiquetan con el número de lote, la fecha y el nombre del banco de leche.

La leche se vuelve a congelar a -20 degrees C y está lista para ser enviada.

¿Qué hace la pasteurización Holder a la leche humana?

A continuación se ofrece un resumen del artículo de 2016 de Peila, publicado en Nutrients. (Referencia 2)

En el siguiente cuadro se resume más información sobre la comparación entre la leche materna fresca, la leche donada y la fórmula infantil. (Referencia 3)

La leche donada por el miembro de HMBANA, Mothers' Milk Bank Northeast Mothers Milk, cuesta 4,50 dólares por onza, lo que permite pagar los gastos de personal, procesamiento y envío. Según la declaración de mejores prácticas de HMBANA 2019, la leche donada descongelada y pasteurizada se puede almacenar en un refrigerador durante 48 horas.

¿Sabías que?

  • En más de 40 años de bancos de leche modernos, nunca ha habido un caso documentado de un bebé que haya recibido daños por causa de leche donada.

  • Brasil es líder mundial en bancos de leche, con 216 bancos de leche y 127 puntos de recogida de leche. (Referencia 4) El país tiene al menos un banco de leche en cada uno de sus 26 estados. Los bomberos son los encargados de llevar la leche materna a los depósitos. (Un depósito de leche es un lugar de recogida convenientemente situado que acepta leche de donantes de leche humana aprobados). En algunos estados, los bomberos recogen la leche de las donantes a diario porque pocos hogares brasileños tienen frigoríficos o congeladores lo suficientemente grandes como para guardar la leche. Los mismos bancos de leche realizan las actividades tradicionales de los bancos de leche y otras. Llevan a cabo programas de formación para consejeros comunitarios y sirven como lugares de acceso a pediatras, trabajadores sociales y otros tipos de personas de apoyo. Los bancos de leche realizan las actividades tradicionales de los bancos de leche y otras. Llevan a cabo programas de formación para consejeros comunitarios y sirven como lugares de acceso a pediatras, trabajadores sociales y otros tipos de personas de apoyo. Las madres son remitidas a los bancos de leche para recibir apoyo tras el alta del hospital de maternidad.

  • Muchas unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatales recurren a la leche donada, ya que organizaciones médicas como la Organización Mundial de la Salud y la Academia Americana de Pediatría recomiendan la leche donada para los bebés prematuros como protección contra la enterocolitis necrotizante (ECN).

  • Si es necesario dar un suplemento a un lactante, la Academia de Medicina de la Lactancia Materna recomienda elegir el suplemento en el siguiente orden: #1 leche materna extraída, #2 leche humana de donante, y #3 fórmula infantil. (Referencia 5)

Referencias

1.  Sitio web de la Asociación de Bancos de Leche Humana de Norteamérica (HMBANA). www.hmbana.org

2.  Peila C, Moro GE, Bertino E, et al. The effects of Holder pasteurization on nutrients and biologically-active components in donor human milk: A review. [Los efectos de la pasteurización Holder en los nutrientes y componentes biológicamente activos de la leche humana donada: Un análisis] Nutrients. 2016 Aug;8(8):477. doi.10.3390/nu8080477

3.  Core Curriculum for Lactation Consultant Practice [Plan de estudios básico para la práctica del consultor de lactancia], 3ra edición. Editado por Rebecca Mannel, Patricia J. Martens y Marsha Walker. 2013. Chapter 36: Donor Human Milk Banking. Pages 701-714. James & Bartlett Learning

4. Gutierrez D, et al. Human milk banks in Brazil [Bancos de leche humana en Brasil]. J Human Lac. 1998;14(4): 333-335.

5. Kellams A, et al. ABM Clinical Protocol #3: Supplementary Feedings in the Healthy Term Breastfed Neonate, Revised 2017 [Clinical Protocol #3: Tomas complementarias en el neonato sano amamantado a término, revisado en 2017. Breastfeed Med. 2017;12(3). www.bfmed.org/protocols